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DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH FACULTY

BRIAN CREMINS

Office: L233B

Phone: 847-925-2389

E-Mail: bcremins@harpercollege.edu

Courses Taught:

English 101

English 102

Literature 115

Background:

PhD, University of Connecticut, 2004

MA, University of Connecticut, 1997

BA, Dartmouth College, 1995

Academic Interests:

Graphic Novels, Comic Books, and Comic Art

Memory Studies and Psychoanalytic Theory

African American Literature and Film

Publications:

“Bumbazine, Blackness, and the Myth of the Redemptive South in Walt Kelly’s Pogo” in Brannon Costello and Qiana J. Whitted (Eds), Comics and the US South.  Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2012.  29-61.

“Depersonalization, Mysticism, and Mourning in John Porcellino's Perfect Example and Carrie McNinch's You Don't Get There from Here.”  International Journal of Comic Art 13.1 (Spring 2011): 249-274.

"Jack Kirby's Midnight Masterpiece." The Jack Kirby Collector #44 (Fall 2005): 24-26.

“ ‘I Asked for Water (She Gave Me Gasoline)’: Tim Truman's Scout and Social Satire in the Independent Comics of the 1980s.”   International Journal of Comic Art 5.2 (Fall 2003): 339-350.

"Oscar Micheaux, Charles Chesnutt, and the ‘Historical Novel.’ " Journal of American and Comparative Cultures 25.1-2 (Spring/Summer 2002): 155-160.

"'Why have you allowed me to see you without your mask?': Captain America #133 and the Great American (Protest) Novel."  International Journal of Comic Art 4.1 (Spring 2002): 239-47.

Selected Conference Papers/Presentations:

"'Automatic Writing for the Common Man': Walt Kelly's Vision of the South in Pogo,” The International Comic Arts Forum, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, October 15, 2009.

"Family Systems Theory, Metaphor, and Autobiography in John Porcellino's Perfect Example," Popular Culture/American Culture Association Conference, New Orleans, April 2009.

"Oscar Micheaux's Afro-Modernist Detective Novels and his Revision of the Pulp Fictions of the 1930s", a talk in the 2004 Oscar Micheaux Lectures on Race and Media sponsored by the Film Studies Center and Race/Film Study Group, University of Chicago, May 2004.