Events Archive

 

Spring 2016 Events

Read Around the World: Faculty International Book Discussion Group

Date: Friday, February 26

Time: 12 - 2 pm

Location: Academy lounge

Audience: Faculty, Staff, Administrators

Beyond the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity by Katherine Boo winner of the Pulitzer Prize and a MacArthur Genius Award grant. This non-fiction account reads like a novel and weaves a story of heart-break and despair while also recognizing reslience in the face of inequality. It will be moderated by Michael Harkins of the History Department.

International Education Summit: Teaching Global Sustainability

Date: Friday, March 4

Time: 8:30 am – 3 pm

Location: Wojcik Conference Center

Audience: Students, Faculty, Staff, Administrators and Community members

Historically, “sustainability” has been defined as how biological systems endure and remain diverse and productive. In an interconnected world of increasingly limited resources, the scope of the term sustainability not only encompasses the environmental but also the social, economic, and cultural spheres. International Education presents a unique avenue to promote innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to teaching these vital subjects in their global context.

Our keynote this year will be delivered by Anuradha Mittal, founder and executive director of the Oakland Institute. Anuradha Mittal is an internationally renowned expert on trade, development, human rights, and agriculture issues. Recipient of several awards, Anuradha Mittal was named as the Most Valuable Thinker in 2008 by the Nation magazine. The afternoon sessions will feature presentations by Harper faculty who incorporate sustainability issues in their courses.

Global Refugee Crisis Panel Discussion

Date: Thursday, April 7

Time: 12:30 - 1: 45 pm

Location: Wojcik Conference Center Amphitheatre

Audience: Students, Faculty, Staff, Administrators and Community members

From Central America to North Africa, the Middle East to Southeast Asia, the world is currently experiencing the largest crisis of forced displacement since WWII. The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimated the total population of displaced people around the world in 2014 at 60 million. The crisis is particularly severe for Syrians, where 11 million people have been displaced and more than 4 million forced to leave the country.

Behind all the statements and statistics about refugees, asylum seekers, the internally displaced, and the stateless are real people with harrowing tales of suffering and loss, as well as hope and ambition. This symposium will serve as a platform to consider the crisis and plight of refugees and asylum seekers fleeing war and poverty from across the globe, including the response in Europe and the United States, where a firestorm of controversy has erupted over whether to continue to accept Syrian refugees after the deadly attacks in Paris.

Speakers include

Dr. Jeanine Ntihirageza of Northeastern Illinois University: “Impact of Multiple Migrations on Refugee Identity”

In recent years, the Great Lakes of Africa have experienced a multifaceted cycle of political violence in a form of war and/or genocide.The result has been a continuous movement of people, many of them having to flee numerous times from country to country.For these people, the definition of home country becomes a challenge.While many scholars have already examined the complexities of transnational resettlements (e.g. Basch et al.1994; Levitt 2001), little has been done to explore the resulting issue of identity.In this presentation, I investigate the impact of forced multiple migrations on identity at the individual, family and societal levels.

Mr. Kenneth Elisapana of South Sudan Voice of Hope: "Refugees and Terrorism”

This is a very important topic to discuss because today more than 50 million people are living as refugees having been forced to flee their homes. They are the most traumatized and vulnerable people in the world. The issue of refugees is politically charged topic here in the United States, rightly so because of the recent horrific terrorist attacks in Paris and Brussels. How do we strike a balance between civil liberty and safety?

Dr. Judy Ledgerwood from NIU’s Center for Southeast Asian Studies: “Refugees in Southeast Asia: A Historical Perspective”

Dr. Ledgerwood will speak about the exodus of refugees from Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos from 1975 through the 1980s. The process provides an interesting historical perspective to discussions of refugee flows today.Her talk will also discuss some current refugee populations in Southeast Asia, including Karen and Kachin refugees on the Thai Burmese and Thai Chinese borders and the Rohingya people who have been leaving Myanmar by boat.

Dr. Linda Herrera of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign: "Migrations across the Mediterranean"

In 2011 the Arab uprisings erupted as popular movements for “bread, freedom, and social justice.” After a short-lived period of optimism, counter-revolution and regional conflicts erupted which resulted in mass migrations of people internally, to neighboring countries, and into Europe. This talk will raise questions about refugees as a political category with a particular focus on children and youth from Syria and Egypt who have fled across the Mediterranean into Europe.

The LGBT Community Going Global

Dates: April 18 and 25

Time: 3:30 - 4:30 pm

Location: J 152

Audience: Students, Faculty and Staff

Dr. Monica Edwards of Harper’s Sociology Department will lead a two-part event that focuses on how global industrialization affects the LGBT community. This event will consist of an engaging film/lecture on April 18th, followed by a structured student centered discussion of the topic on April 25. Either event can be attended on its own or in conjunction with one another.

Second Language Acquisition Symposium: "How Adults Learn Language"

Date: April 29

Time: 9 am to 12 pm

Location: Z 102

Audience: Faculty, Staff, Administrators and Community members

Learning a language can be easy for children but difficult for adults. Learn how the brain processes language and what techniques and strategies you can use to facilitate better language learning for your adult students.

Keynote speaker:

Dr. Kara Morgan-Short, Associate Professor, Department of Hispanic and Italian Studies, Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois-Chicago

CEU Registration Information

For directions about to register for either or both of the sessions, please visit the following URL:http://dept.harpercollege.edu/cii/facdev/register.html

Course Number: CRN 51036

Credit: .3 CEUs

Read Around the World: Faculty International Book Discussion Group

Date: Friday, April 22

Time: 12 - 2 pm

Location: Academy lounge

Audience: Faculty, Staff, Administrators

Moderator: Dr. Brian Cremins

Abina and the Important Men: A Graphic History is three books in one: a graphic account of a 1876 court transcript, the written court transcript plus a detailed historical account that gives context to the graphic story.Winner of the American Historical Association’s James Harvey Robinson Prize, it’s a must read on many levels.It’s the story of a strong woman wrongfully enslaved, who escaped to British territory and takes her former master to court with enduring implications.

Abina and the Important Men is available from Amazon and other bookstores:

http://www.amazon.com/Abina-Important-Men-Graphic-History/dp/0190238747/ref=dp_ob_image_bk

Fall 2015 Events

International Transgender Day of Remembrance

Date: Thursday, November 19

Time: TBA

Location: TBA

Description: TBA

Read Around the World

Date: Friday, November 6

Time: 12 -2 pm

Location: Academy lounge

Audience: Faculty

Description: Join us for our second fall semester Read Around the World, the Harper Faculty Book Seminar, and read Nelson Mandela:  A Life Inspired by Gillian Kendall. Considered one of the greatest leaders in the world, Mandela lived a full and vibrant life.  Kendall’s biography offers a quick sketch of his upbringing, political and religious beliefs, and an outline of his struggle to bring freedom and political empowerment to his people.  This discussion will be facilitated by Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence Jimrex Byamugisha.

International Education Week: November 2-6

Southeast Asian Language Roadshow

Date: Monday, November 2

Time: 12:30 - 2 pm

Location: A238

Audience: Harper students, faculty, staff, and community

Description: Explore Southeast Asia, the crossroads of the world, with the NIU Center for Southeast Asian Studies. Learn about this dynamic part of the globe in a 30-minute lecture by CSEAS Outreach Coordinator Julien Ehrenkönig (M.A. Anthropology, NIU) and at language discovery tables hosted by native speakers from Burma (Myanmar), Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand. Pick up a few basics of these Southeast Asian languages and find out about generous funding opportunities for taking one of these languages as part of your degree.  Selamat datang!

Symposium of Student Work in Global Focus: Africa

Date: Tuesday, Nov 3

Time: 12:30 - 1:45 pm

Location: W 219

Audience: Harper students, faculty, staff, and community

Description: Our second symposium, the day will feature riveting presentations of Harper students’ visual projects, essays, and posters. Please join us in this celebration of exemplary student work on African themes, topics, and texts!

Human Rights Expo

Date: Wednesday, Nov 4

Time: 9 am – 4 pm

Location: A 238

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description: Join us for an exciting programming joint venture between the Office of International Education and the Human Services Program. The International Human Rights Expo will bring together in one place a variety of organizations involved in human rights issues, locally, nationally, and internationally. Learn about the significance of human rights struggles both locally and globally and seek out opportunities to get involved safeguarding these important values. The International Human Rights Expo is also a great way to meet other people who want to learn about ways to change the world and gain the necessary tools to do so. We will be holding workshops and presentations through the morning and afternoon. The Expo presentations are relevant to careers in social sciences, health care, education, to name only a few.

GermanFest

Date: Thursday, Nov 5

Time: 12 - 1 pm

Location: A-building atrium

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description: Enjoy free tasting samples of German food, courtesy of Bavaria Hof restaurant, and listen to German music! German Club will provide information about study abroad and language courses, and give some mini German lessons. This year also marks the 25th anniversary of German reunification. Please join us in celebrating 25 years of unity and freedom!

Contact Kim Jaeger for more information, contact kjaeger@harpercollege.edu.

Service Learning Opportunities through Harper

Date: Thursday, November 5

Time: 12:30 – 1:30 pm

Location: X 250ab

Are you passionate about travel, learning about different cultures or social impact? Are you considering a career in the international space or social entrepreneurship?  Then join us to learn more! This session will be moderated by Kathryn Pisco, who is the founder of Unearth the World – a social venture that promotes cross-cultural learning through responsible volunteer exchange programs and aims to cultivate global leaders. Kathryn will give a brief presentation about how-to get involved in international service, leadership and social entrepreneurship. She will tell you about her own international experience and how she was able to turn travel into her profession. She will also provide useful tips and tricks for building international into your career plan.

Student Panel on Bias

Date: Thursday, Nov 5

Time: 2 - 3:15 pm

Location: X 140

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description: Students tell stories of their encounters with bias in the US and abroad. Bias is a pre-formed negative opinion or attitude based on unreasoned judgment or belief.  It is a culturally conditioned phenomenon that may be reflected in threatening or harassing behavior toward a person or group of people based on real or perceived identity factors, including (but certainly not limited to) race, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, national origin, and/or religion.  It is the responsibility of every member of our College community to combat bias by fostering an environment of respect, openness, and understanding.  We invite you to join us for an interactive panel discussion of about experiences of and attitudes towards bias and discrimination in the U.S. and other countries around the world by Harper students.

Read Around the World

Date: Friday, September 25

Time: 12 -2 pm

Location: Academy lounge

Audience: Faculty

Description: Join us this fall as Read Around the World, the Harper Faculty Book Seminar explores harem life in Fez, Morocco during the late 1940s through the early 1950s.  Written as a fictive memoir, Fatima Mernissi, a well-respected Moroccan sociologist, creates a personal and touching story of life within a traditional harem.  Mernissi introduces us through heart-felt dialogue to the thoughts and desires of the women in her family who fantasized of venturing into the larger world dominated by men while creating a sisterhood of support within the family home.  Mernissi also adds support to the story by including her professional insights into historic and modern Muslim culture.  Come, experience, and discuss Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood.  This book selection will be moderated by Patricia Hamlen who traveled to Morocco in 1999 and wrote an ethnography of her own entitled “Dreams of Trespass Continue for a Young Moroccan Woman” published in 2007.

Faculty Study Abroad Information Session

Date:  Tuesday, September 22

Time:  4 – 5:30 pm

Location:  X250ab

Audience: Faculty

Description:  If you are interested in taking a group of students overseas, join us to find out how to make your dreams a reality!  Never thought about it, but are intrigued: join us to learn the process of creating your own unique study abroad experience for your students.

Study Abroad Open House

Date:  Wednesday, September 16

Time:  5 - 6:30 pm

Location: X250ab

Audience: Students

Description: Have you ever thought about studying abroad? Join us to hear about Harper College’s faculty-led short term study abroad programs for 2015-2016.

Welcome Reception for Fullbright Scholar-in-Residence

Date: Wednesday, September 2

Time: 3:30 – 5:30 pm

Location: PAC Lobby

Audience: students, faculty, and staff

Description: The Office of International Education is happy to invite you to a reception to meet and welcome Jimrex Byamugisha, lecturer in the School of Statistics and Planning at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. Professor Byamugisha will be in residence at Harper College for the fall semester.  If you are interested in having Mr. Byamugisha visit your classes, please contact Rich Johnson.  Prof. Byamugisha will also be holding several workshops and presentations during the semester.  Look for more details to follow!

Spring 2015 Events

First Annual International Photo Competition

Thank you to everyone who participated in our First Annual International Photo Competition by submitting photos, viewing, and/or voting for them. The winning photos will be on display in the library until the end of this semester and in the fall during International Education Week (November 2 – 6, 2015). They will also be included in a calendar to be sold in the fall.

Winners of the 2015 1st Annual International Photo Competition

Architecture and Landmarks

1st “Serenity” Vilnius, Lithuania by Christopher Dwyer

2nd “View from the Doges’ Palace” Venice, Italy by Bhasker Morthy

3rd “Shiva Temple” Khajuvaho, India by Bhasker Morthy

People

1st “Honeymoon Kiss” Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Germany by Doug Manley

2nd “To the Rescue” Paris, France by Christopher Dwyer

3rd “Man and Swan” Geneva, Switzerland by Patrick Frendreis

Landscape

1st “Awe-inspiring Beauty” Lake Plivice, Croatia by Linda Schumacher

2nd “View of Konigssee in morning fog” Schonau am Konigssee, Germany by Doug Manley

3rd “Sunrise view from the guard’s hut” Machu Picchu, Peru by Sandra Vega-Picchietti

Culture

1st   “Together After Death – Catacombs” Paris, France by Christopher Dwyer

2nd “Construction Workers” Jaipur, India by Bhasker Morthy

3rd “Inca king passing as part of the Inti Raymi festival” Cuzco, Peru by Eric Bohman

3rd “Weaver at Inti Nan, Mitad del Mundo (Equator)” Quito, Ecuador by Linda Schumacher

Best Overall International Photo

1st “Awe-inspiring Beauty” Lake Plivice, Croatia by Linda Schumacher

2nd “Private Residence near Chateau” Azay le Rideau, France by Willis Boughton

For those of you who would like to have your photos returned to you and will not be on display, please contact LSchumac@harpercollege.edu. We will have your photos in an envelope for you to pick up from L203 by April 30th. We will be contacting the winners about your prizes. Thanks again!

Peacebuilding Series: Teaching Conflict, Trauma, and Peace

“Peacebuilding for Life: Careers in Peace”

Date: Thursday, April 16 CANCELLED

Time: 11 am – 12:45 pm

Location: X 250ab

Audience: Harper students, faculty, staff, and community

Description:  A “peace” professional is a difficult career path to embark upon and for many students it is not considered as frequently as other options.  How does one begin a career in peace-building, and what kinds of skills do organizations look for as they hire in this field?  In this panel discussion, individuals who have created opportunities themselves working in the fields of peace-building, reconciliation, equality, trauma or human rights will be available to discuss how they found their professions. An extended Q&A session will be allowed to address audience’s interests.

 

Read Around the World

The Southern Tiger: Chile's Fight for a Democratic and Prosperous Future by Ricardo Lagos

Date: Friday, April 10 Time: 12 – 2 pm

Location: Academy for Teaching Excellence

Moderator: Andrew Levin, Department of History/Political Science

Audience: Harper faculty and staff

Description: During the 1970s and 1980s, Chile was a natural laboratory for the University of Chicago-based ideas of neoliberal economic policies. They failed. Individual wealth fell, human rights were non-existant, and only a small, corrupt elite prospered. Flash-forward to today and the picture is radically different: the country is prosperous and democratic. It even plays above its weight in international politics. This book gives the reader a rare glimpse of how strong leadership and the right policies can succeed. In this autobiography by one its influential former presidents, we learn the inside story for how Chile became the Southern Tiger and began to roar.

Global Gurus Hangout

“The ‘Woman Question’: Rethinking Gender from an African Perspective”

Date: Wednesday, March 18 (rescheduled)

Time: 3:30 – 4:45 pm

Location: Academy for Teaching Excellence (F 164d)

Moderator: Dr. Monica Edwards, Department of Sociology

Audience: Harper faculty and staff

Description: Join us for a discussion of Nigerian sociologist, Oyeronke Oyewumi's book, The Invention of Women: Making an African Sense of Western Gender Discourses (University of Minnesota Press, 1997).  In this work, Oyewumi rethinks gender as a Western construction and uses pre-colonial Yoruban culture to critique the universality of a Western feminist discourse. Selections of this text will be available prior to the discussion.

African Lecture Series

“The Science of Ebola”

Date: Tuesday, March 10

Time: 2 - 3:15 pm * * NOTE TIME CHANGE

Location: A 243 * * NOTE ROOM CHANGE

Presenter: Dr. Andrew Iverson, Department of Biology

Audience: Harper students, faculty, staff, and community

Description:  Recently, Western Africa experienced an outbreak of the Ebola virus killing over five thousand people. This has led to a great deal of confusion and an incomplete picture of what has transpired.  This lecture will seek to help create a clearer picture on the subject of Ebola through discussion in a number of areas.  There will be focus on defining what is Ebola as a virus and a disease. We will look into what transpired with recent outbreak in West Africa, how it differed from previous outbreaks and how it lead to cases in the United States. What was and is being done to treat and prevent Ebola outbreaks will be explored as well.

Teaching Africa Today

“Symposium of Student Work”

Date: Wednesday, February 25

Time: 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm

Location: W 218

Audience: Harper students, faculty, staff, and community

Description: Our inaugural symposium, the day will feature riveting presentations of Harper students’ visual projects, essays, and posters. Please join us in this celebration of exemplary student work on African themes, topics, and texts!

Study Abroad Open House

Date: Wednesday, February 11

Time: 5 – 6:30 pm

Location: X 250ab

Description: Have you ever thought about studying abroad? Join us to hear about Harper's faculty-led short term study abroad programs for 2014-2015.

African Lecture Series

“Urban Growth and Development in East Africa: Kampala and Kigali”

Date: Tuesday, February 10

Time: 1 – 2:15 pm

Location: A 243

Presenter: Dr. James Gramlich, Department of Sociology

Audience: Harper students, faculty, staff, and community

Description: The presentation will examine urbanization in post-colonial East Africa and the current state of both capital cities including the issues facing urban planners. There will be a focus on the historical, political, and economic forces shaping the growth and development of both cities to this point as well as the plans for both moving forward. Whenever possible, comparisons with urban development in other contexts will be utilized.

Read Around the World

We Need New Names: A Novel by NoViolet Bulawayo

Date: Friday, February 6

Time: 12 – 2 pm

Location: Academy for Teaching Excellence

Moderator: Dr. Judi Nitsch, Department of English

Audience: Harper faculty and staff

Description: This Man Booker Prize nominee is a remarkable semi- autobiographical story told through the eyes of a ten year old girl living in Zimbabwe who flees chaos and poverty only to find it again in the USA when immigrating to Detroit, Michigan to live with an Aunt.  Join us as we discuss the inner personal growth that can occur when reconciling two opposing cultural worlds that turn out to be more alike than different.

Global Gurus Hangout

“Contemplative Pedagogy and the Peaceful Classroom”

Date: Wednesday, January 28

Time: 3:30 – 4:45 pm

Location: Academy for Teaching Excellence

Moderator: Dr. Pearl Ratunil, Department of English

Audience: Harper faculty and staff

Description: How can we invite challenging debate and conversation into our classrooms and our workplace in a way that promotes peace and non-violence?  What skills can we cultivate to increase our ability to hear difficult or traumatic international news and still integrate and it without perpetuating more suffering in ourselves or others. For those who teach or discuss challenging topics that include oppression, violence or pessimism it can be difficult to still inspire our students towards transformation and change.  One teaching pedagogy which offers techniques for “bearing witness” is contemplative pedagogy which blends mindfulness and contemplative practices.  This discussion will explain how contemplative pedagogy evolved from an international collaboration between western scientists and Asian philosophers and practitioners and how this collaboration forged the new science called “science of the mind.” Participants will experience mindfulness techniques first hand and discuss their promise or perils in academia.

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Fall 2014

African Lecture Series:

Topic: “The Preservation and Conservation of Dian Fossey’s Mountain Gorilla:  Primate Behavioral Research or Lucrative Tourism?”

Date: Wednesday, September 3

Time: 3:30 – 4:45 p.m.

Place:  Z 129

Presenter: Patricia Hamlen, Anthropology

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Abstract: This presentation hopes to provide some insights into this history of Mountain Gorilla Research and the on-going concerns over human contact with this endangered species.  Along with a look at the “active conservation” approach used by Dian Fossey before her death, competing approaches have also been instrumental to the gorilla’s survival.  Still controversy continues regarding how current funding is being allocated to preserve a national treasure not only for Rwanda but Uganda and the Congo as well.   Join us as we track the Titus Group, learn more about one of closest animal relatives and what the future may hold for the “king of the rain forest.”

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Study Abroad Open House

Date: Wednesday, September 10

Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Place: A 243

Description: Have you ever thought about studying abroad? Join us to hear about Harper's faculty-led short term study abroad programs for 2014-2015.

Read Around the World Faculty Book Discussion Group

Date: Friday, September 12

Time: 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.

Place: Academy for Teaching Excellence

Audience: Harper faculty and staff

Topic: The Black Russian by Vladimir Alexandrov

This is the incredible true life story of a young African-American man who seeks his fortune first in Chicago, Brooklyn and London later immigrating to Russia, a highly unusual move.  This narrative highlights his adventures as the owner of famous restaurants and nightclubs only to fall victim to racism and his own extravagant living.

Moderated by Mukila Maitha, Geography

INFUSE THIS! International Curriculum Infusion Workshop series

“Worldly storytelling with integrative GIS web-based maps”

Instructor: Mukila Maitha, Geography

Date: Thursday, September 25 from 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

Place: F 164A

Audience: Harper faculty and staff (CEUs available)

Join us to learn how you can help your students create visual narratives with free GIS (Geographic Information Systems) templates and technology. In a world where we are inundated with information, a map, like many pictures, is “worth a thousand words” because maps provide compelling and creative avenues for the integration and visualization of information (numeric data, text, images, video, audio) in the process of knowledge construction.

For instructions about registering, visit the Faculty Development webpage:

http://dept.harpercollege.edu/cii/facdev/register.html

Register for LFD0625-001/ CRN: 20909

CREDIT: 0.1 CEU

Space is limited, so register now!

African Lecture Series:

Topic: “African-American poetry specifically related to the slave trade”

Date: Wednesday, October 1

Time: 3:30 – 4:45 p.m.

Place: A 243

Presenter: Andrew Wilson, English

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Abstract:  The North-American slave trade produced immeasurable human suffering, and that suffering is documented not only in history books but, as well, in some of the most important (and sometimes, oddly, the most beautiful) literature ever written – in America, or anywhere. We will have a look at a few examples of that literature, perhaps paying special attention to the poets Phillis Wheatley and Paul Laurence Dunbar, the autobiographer Frederick Douglass, and the amazing contemporary fiction writer Toni Morrison.

Study Abroad Open House

Date: Tuesday, October 14

Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Place: A 243

Description: Have you ever thought about studying abroad? Join us to hear about Harper's faculty-led short term study abroad programs for 2014-2015.

International Education Week: Monday, October 27 to Friday, October 31

Tuesday, October 28:

Poster Board session by Honors Geography Students (GEG 103: The Developing World)

Time: 11:00 a.m.– 12:15 p.m.

Place: A building corridor

Description: Join us for a poster board presentation by Geography Honors students. In keeping with the college’s regional focus on Africa, these students are focusing on Uganda and Rwanda. Their posters will cover a variety of topics from human rights, education, genocide, economic development, and the environmental impacts of globalization.

Wednesday, October 29:

Human Rights Expo 2014

Time: 9 am – 4 pm

Place: A building corridor with presentations in A 243

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description: Join us for an exciting programming joint venture between International Studies and Programs and the Human Services Program. The International Human Rights Expo will bring together in one place a variety of organizations involved in human rights issues, locally, nationally, and internationally. Learn about the significance of human rights struggles around the world and find opportunities to get involved safeguarding these important values. The International Human Rights Expo is also a great way to meet other people who want to learn about ways to change the world and gain the necessary tools to do so. We will be holding workshops and presentations through the morning and afternoon.

Session One

Title: “Human Trafficking: A Global Issue with Local Impact”

Time/Location: 9:30 - 10:45 am in A 243

Presenter: Elyse Dobney, MSW, Volunteer Manager/Trafficking Specialist, STOP-IT Program, Salvation Army.

Description: Human trafficking is modern day slavery, alive and thriving throughout the United States. This session will address the methods by which individuals are recruited and controlled for purposes of trafficking and ways in which service providers and community members can safely identify and engage suspected victims they encounter in their communities.

Session Two

Title: “Community Services in a Globalized Era: The Role of the Helping Professional in Conflict and Disaster”

Time/Location: 11 am - 12:15 pm in A 243

Presenter: Dr. Michelle Martin, PhD, MSW, DePaul University.

Description: As globalization continues to change our world, and the field of human services is changing rapidly as well. Human services professionals are increasingly being called upon to serve at-risk populations at home and abroad. So what do international human services professionals do? What populations do they serve? How do they help alleviate suffering in unimaginable conditions found in war and natural disasters? This session explores In the area of international relief work including how those in the human services professions work to protect human dignity during and after a range of global emergencies. Humanitarian emergencies may include armed civil conflict, natural disasters, and situations involving extreme food and water insecurity. Human services professionals play key roles in international relief by helping the world’s most vulnerable – those struggling with chronic poverty, and members of historically marginalized groups - often those who are the most profoundly affected by such global crises.

Session Three

Title: “Using a Human Rights Framework in International Human Services”

Time/Location: 12:30 - 1: 45 pm in A 243

Presenter: Dr. Michelle Martin, PhD, MSW, DePaul University.

Description: Global social problems are on the rise: poverty, conflict, human trafficking, gender-based violence. How can human services professionals work toward advocating for the rights of the populations most at risk of being impacted by such atrocities? Approaching global problems within a human rights framework is one effective way of working on behalf of vulnerable and marginalized populations because such a frameworks begins with the notion that all human beings, regardless of gender, socio-economic status, nationality, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or age have basic inalienable rights. This workshop begins with an exploration of global social problems that are on the rise, and how the UN Human Rights Treaty system can help us better advocate against social inequities in all levels of society, at home and throughout the world.

Session Four

Title: “Displaced Persons: Advocacy and Activism with Immigrants and Refugees”

Time/Location: 2 - 3:15 pm in A 243

Presenters: April Flores Brayton, ICDVP, Manager of Suburban Latina Outreach for the WINGS Program; Victoria Bran, LCSW, Director of Mount Prospect Community Connections Center; and Melanie Schikore, Ph.D. Interfaith Committee for Detained Immigrants, Interfaith Immigration Coalition, Heartland Alliance.

 

African Lecture Series

"Urban Growth and Development in East Africa: Kampala and Kigali”

Presenter: Dr. James Gamlich, Department of Sociology

Time/Location: 2 - 3:30 pm in W 218

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description: The presentation will examine urbanization in post-colonial East Africa and the current state of both capital cities including the issues facing urban planners. There will be a focus on the historical, political, and economic forces shaping the growth and development of both cities to this point as well as the plans for both moving forward. Whenever possible, comparisons with urban development in other contexts will be utilized.

 

Thursday, October 30:

Ebola Awareness Student Panel

Time/Location: 9 – 10 am in Z 117

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description: Join us to find out more about Ebola.  How does one catch it?  What’s being done to contain the virus/reduce the spread of the disease in West Africa? A panel of students will discuss this important topic.

 

Breaking Bias: Student Panel on Bias in the US and Abroad

Time/Location: 11 am – 12:45 pm in A 243

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description: Bias is a pre-formed negative opinion or attitude based on unreasoned judgment or belief. It is a culturally conditioned phenomenon that may be reflected in threatening or harassing behavior toward a person or group of people based on real or perceived identity factors, including (but certainly not limited to) race, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, national origin, and/or religion. It is the responsibility of every member of our College community to combat bias by fostering an environment of respect, openness, and understanding. We invite you to join us for an interactive panel discussion about experiences and attitudes towards bias in the U.S. and abroad by students enrolled in Harper’s ELITE (Engagement and Leadership Initiative to Transition Effectively) program. This event is co-sponsored by ELITE and International Studies and Programs.

 

African Lecture Series:

"The Art of Reductionism, Or  How to Teach Africa (or Any Other Overwhelmingly Complex Subject) in 16 Weeks"

Time/Location: 3:30 - 5 pm in A 243

Presenter:  Judy Kaplow, Department of Humanities

Audience: Harper community (students, faculty, staff, and public)

Description: Most students come to the study of Africa with only a few bits of knowledge, most of which are usually incorrect or, if factual, misleading or prejudicial. It’s not that this never happens in any other class. Quite the contrary, a 100-level college class on African cultures is merely an excellent example of a serious, fairly common problem. What do we – what can we – accomplish in sixteen weeks, when the gap between the student’s pre-course preparation and the desired course outcomes is so large, or when we’re tasked with squeezing a multiple-year topic into a single, 3 credit course? My response has been to use the exemplar: the individual case that can be used to represent the whole.

This presentation will attempt to offer an exemplar of teaching broad topics in narrow spaces through an exemplar of teaching African cultures. We will look at using a single, notable African cultural tradition and the relationships between its literature, art, popular culture, and current events, as a practical method for introducing students to a more thorough study of African cultures, and perhaps, as one model for helping students grasp and hold onto any topic that suffers from gigantism.

Friday, October 31:

Read Around the World Faculty Book Discussion Group

Time: 12 – 2 pm in the Academy for Teaching Excellence

Audience: Harper faculty and staff

Topic: All Our Names by Dinaw Mengestu

This timely novel intersects two worlds: Midwest America and East Africa. Young award-winning author Dinaw Mengestu was born in Ethiopia and grew up in the American Midwest. His focus has been to write about the cultural, spiritual, and social loss that comes with the act of migration. However, this story is told from the perspective of a lonely woman living in the Midwest. Through a secret and intimate relationship, she learns the story of her lover and his friendship with another young man he met in Uganda, both dreaming of a brighter future. Their lives and actions take them in different directions but their ultimate shared goal is to achieve a better life.

Moderated by Richard Middleton-Kaplan, English

Global Gurus Hangout

Topic: Peace-building by Women’s Collectives in Rwanda and Uganda

Date: Tuesday, November 4

Time: 3:30-4:45 p.m.

Place: Academy for Teaching Excellence

Audience: Harper faculty and staff

Facilitators: Valerie Walker and Richard Middleton-Kaplan

Abstract: We preview our discussion with brief videos about collectives of women survivors actively working for post-genocide reconciliation and combating social injustice in Rwanda, and Betty Bigombe’s efforts to resolve Uganda’s civil war and to negotiate an end to violence with the LRA’s notorious Joseph Kony. We will also share photos and stories from our encounters with members of collectives during our recent field-based seminar. Our discussion will focus on how to introduce this topic to students, how to break through stereotypical views that ignore the role of women in peace-building, and why women’s local collectives may be more effective than national or international peace-building mechanisms. Lastly, we will look at how collective action promotes autonomy for the activists and for their societies, and then discuss how to encourage students to participate in collective action in their own communities.

Peacebuilding Series: "Teaching Conflict, Trauma and Peace"

Workshop: Contemplative Practice and Peacebuilding

Date: Friday, November 7

Time: 10 am - 12 pm.

Place: Z 131

Audience: Harper faculty and staff (CEUs available)

Presenter: Pearl Ratunil, English

Abstract:  What's the relationship between inner peace and global peace? How can a calm mind confront violence and hatred with peacefulness and courage? In this workshop, participants will be introduced to mindfulness practices that can cultivate inner states of peace, a necessary foundation for meeting challenges both locally and internationally. The workshop with begin with a brief overview of recent scientific research of mindfulness. This will be followed with mindfulness instruction and participation, and then suggestions for including mindfulness in one's workplace including the classroom.

For instructions about registering, visit the Faculty Development webpage:

http://dept.harpercollege.edu/cii/facdev/register.html

Register for LFD0624-002/ CRN: 20924

Location: Z 131

Credit: 0.2 CEU

Peacebuilding Series: "Teaching Conflict, Trauma and Peace"

Panel Discussion: “Life after War: Surviving and Thriving after Trauma”

Date: Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Time: 11:30 – 12:45 pm

Place:  W 218

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description: As military personnel return from international conflicts, they face challenges and opportunities in their transition to life state-side. In this informative panel discussion, a veteran and representatives from organizations which support veterans will meet to discuss the challenges and rewards of life after conflict or trauma. Thresholds, Illlinois’ largest community-based mental health agency, offers specialized services to veterans including mindfulness training, while Pets for Vets for rescues, trains, and pairs shelter pets with veterans who could benefit from a companion animal. Click here for a flyer.

Panelists

Charlie Bourne, Veteran and Harper Student

Benito Olson, Animal Trainer, Pets for Vets,

Lydia Zopf, Program Director, Veterans Project, Thresholds

Michele Decanio, Harper College Counselor

Pearl Ratunil, Panel Facilitator, Department of English, Harper College

Presentation on Homeless Youth in Chicago

Date: Monday, November 17

Time: 1 to 3 pm

Location:   E 108

Audience:  Harper students, faculty, staff, and community

Description: The Harper College Department of Anthropology and Sociology invites you to join Natalie Robinson, a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Liverpool, for a presentation of ethnographic work on homeless youth in Chicago. This work focuses on homeless youth experiences and perceptions of inclusion in and exclusion from public urban spaces in Chicago. It encompasses six months of fieldwork in the city as well as a participatory photography project with the HELLO Homeless and Formerly Homeless Youth Activism group in the Lakeview neighborhood.

End of Dialogue

Film Companion to the African Lecture Series

Date: Tuesday, November 18

Time: 3:30 - 5:00 pm

Place: Y 120

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Description from the film's website: "END OF DIALOGUE is a landmark film that was one of the first to reveal the full horrors of apartheid to the world. Made in 1970, the film is valuable not only as a record of apartheid, but as a record of how people's understanding of South Africa was then changing. Produced by a small group of black South African exiles and film students based in London, it caused an uproar when it was originally released. More than 30 years after, the images and facts still shock."

http://icarusfilms.com/new2003/log.html

African Lecture Series

Topic: “On the Nobel Prize Laureate Nadine Gordimer”

Date: Wednesday, November 19

Time: 3:30 – 4:45 pm

Place:  Y 120

Presenter: Seema Kurup, English

Audience: Harper faculty, students, staff, and community members

Abstract: Born and raised in South Africa, Nadine Gordimer is the author of 14 novels and 11 short story collections. A key “white” South African member in the anti-apartheid struggle, Gordimer’s life’s work, her creative writing, remains the most widely-read testimony to the horrors of apartheid and tenuous race relations in South Africa. Both the apartheid and post-apartheid governments of South Africa have banned several of Gordimer’s books – a testament to her life-long political engagement. Winner of the Booker Prize in 1974, Gordimer went on to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1991 for her “magnificent epic writing” which has been of “very great benefit to humanity,” according to the Nobel Prize committee.

Spring 2014 Events

Read Around the World Book Discussion

Paul Bowles, The Sheltering Sky

Faculty Moderator:  Dr. Kurt Hemmer, Department of English

Considered a classic of the 20th century, _The Sheltering Sky_ takes us to Morocco with three ex-pat Americans in search of the exotic, adventure and personal identity. Set in the unforgiving Sahara desert they soon come to realize they have underestimated the forces that now control their lives. Considered to be Paul Bowles's best, this existential masterpiece expresses in beautiful prose the questions we all ponder regarding life.

Friday, February 21, 2014 Noon-2 p.m.

CRN:50826

Course Number: LFD0597-001

Location: F 164 D

Credit: .2 CEUs

Adjuncts may earn a $50 stipend

 

Yang Erche Namu, with Christine Mathieu, Leaving Mother Lake: A Girlhood at the Edge of the World

This impressive memoir details the childhood of a young aspiring singer who is successful in winnig a scholarship to the Shanghai Music Conservatory. Brought up in a remote rural indigenous area of China she recounts her family life where biological brothers and sisters live together, in the same household, for their entire lives. Women take lovers who are supported by their brothers. While their children, look to their uncle as a father figure. Encapsulated within this young woman are two very different social worlds that she learns to reconcile as she growths and matures.

Friday, April 4, 2014 Noon - 2 pm

CRN: 50899

Course Number: LFD0607-001

Location: F 164 D

Credit: .2 CEUs

Adjuncts may earn a $50 stipend.

Global Guru Hangout

Topic: Cross-cultural perspectives on education

Time: Wednesday, February 26 from 3:15-4:45 p.m.

Place: The Academy for Teaching Excellence

Abstract: We will preview our discussion on cross-cultural perspectives on education with an excerpt from the documentary 2 Million Minutes (Bob Compton) and a short clip from the US Department of Education. Our discussion will focus on US students’ preparedness for college and future careers in terms of expectations, motivation, and study habits in comparison with students from similar backgrounds from India and China. Lastly, we will also consider possible stereotypes that these materials may reinforce, as well the role of culture in creating student expectations, motivation, and study habits.

 

Topic: Global Marriage Policy in Sociological Context

Time: Tuesday, April 22 from 3:15-4:45 p.m.

Place: Academy for Teaching Excellence

Abstract: In the spirit of our theme focused on the African continent, and as we are on the precipice of significant changes both in Illinois and nationally in regards to marriage laws, we will discuss Judith Stacey’s work exploring legislation in America as compared to South African policy. Stacey began this research in response to oppositional arguments to same sex marriage that express concern over “what’s next” (e.g. the ability to marry your goat). She focuses on the “slippery slope” to legalized polygamy, by exploring the South African context where both same sex marriage and polygamous marriages are constitutional.

Reference: Stacey, Judith. New Slants on the Slippery Slope: The Politics of Polygamy and Gay Family Rights in South Africa and the United States. Politics & Society June 2009 37: 167-202. If you’d like to read the article before the session, contact Monica Edwards (medwards@harpercollege.edu ).

Komora: to heal

Thursday, April 17 from 2 to 3:30 pm: D-233 (*note room change from flyer*)

Komora is documentary about the orphan survivors of the 1994 Tutsi genocide in Rwanda and the people who stepped up to raise them, whether they were older siblings, orphanage caretakers, or the orphans themselves when they had no one but each other.

The film is directed by two friends. Emmanuel Habimana, a law student and orphan of the genocide, teams up with Natalia Ledford, an American independent filmmaker and university student from Nebraska. As Natalia narrates the story, Emmanuel takes them throughout Rwanda and halfway around the world as he interviews his peers, family, heroes, and even former killers. From them he hopes to learn what survival has meant for his peers across Rwanda and what it means for them today to live in a society where they must share their communities with killers.

This event is free and open to the public. Click here to print the event flyer.

Fall 2013 Events

2013 International Education Week: October 28 – November 1

This year's International Education Week will showcase Harper Faculty's international experience, research and interests. We invite students, faculty and staff to join us for an exciting week of presentations that will take us to various parts of the globe to learn more about history, anthropology, business, math, linguistics, immigration, and more!

Please see the attached brochure for a detailed schedule. IEW 2013 Brochure

Monday, October 28

Judy Kaplow (Humanities)

The Epic as Fortress: Epic Poetry’s Role in Preserving Cultural Identities under Siege

9:30-10:30 a.m., Room A243

We will consider the positive role of epic poetry as a vehicle for the survival of endangered cultures. We will also talk about implications for outside scholars and translators, and the role of epic poetry in propaganda, romanticized nationalism, and siege-mentality nationalism. 

Alina Pajtek (Linguistics)

Taste, Affect, and Gender Representations in US and Romanian Media Discourse

12:30-1:30 p.m., Room A242ab

This presentation applies Goffman’s construct of the presentation of self (Goffman, 1959) to understand cross-linguistic and cross-cultural differences and similarities, as well as gender-specific characteristics of affect expressions towards taste in television cooking shows from the US and Romania.  This analysis contributes to a more nuanced understanding of how everyday discursive patterns relate to cultural patterns in general, and those in Romanian and US cultures in particular.

Tuesday, October 29

Julio Alejandro (La Jornada)

Immigration Reform is Dead and Irrelevant

1-2 p.m., Room A242ab

Join the international correspondent and analyst of the largest Latin American newspaper to discuss who are the XXI century immigrants in America. How are they divided? Who is demographically, politically or linguistically (over) represented and profiting from it? Is the McDonald’s illiterate construction worker really asking for a “comprehensive” immigration reform and for a path to citizenship or is it a media construction, aided by an I.T. and financial lobby? Is Obama’s version of immigration reform counterproductive for the marginalized  and oppressed communities? Will it start solving or ameliorating the violence, poverty, education, and unemployment problems? Should you oppose it?

David Richmond (History)

A Brief History of US Foreign Policy in Latin America

2-3 p.m., Room A243

From the Monroe Doctrine to NAFTA, the United States has insisted on steady influence on Latin America’s political and economic affairs. Starting in 1823 and continuing to the present, this talk will focus on some of the major trends in U.S.-Latin American relations and the roles, both positive and negative, that the United States has had on Latin American development.

Wednesday, October 30

Therese Hart (Humanities)

The Transformation of Avalokitesvara to Kuan-yin: from Male Indian Bodhisattva of Compassion to the Female Chinese Goddess of Mercy

9:30-10:30 a.m., Room A243

In her presentation, Therese will discuss the dramatic transformation of the (male) Indian bodhisattva Avalokitesvara into the (female) Chinese Kuan-yin -- from a relatively minor figure in the Buddha's retinue to a universal savior and one of the most popular deities in Chinese religion.

Karl Buschmann & Robin James (Business)

Getting It Right: International Management and Cultural Diversity in the Real World

4-5 p.m., Room A242ab

You don't have to be a meteorologist to know when it's going to rain.  In the same vein, you don't have to be an anthropologist to know how to avoid gaffes, missteps, and blunders in today's diverse and globalized world.  This workshop will help you avoid common gaffes and increase your cultural IQ and effectiveness in a fun and lively interactive session.  Whether you're pursuing anthropology or zoology, this session is for you!

Thursday, October 31

Richard Johnson (English)

To Speak Like Rain: The Poetry of Kofi Awoonor

9:30-10:30 a.m., Room A243

West African poetry was traditionally sung or chanted to the accompaniment of an assortment of percussion instruments. During his prolific career, the Ghanaian poet Kofi Awoonor has struggled to infuse his verse with the rhythm of the ancestral drum. This presentation will scour his poetry for evidence of the ancient traditions of the griot

Charlotte Schulze-Hewitt (Math)

Discover the Math of Ancient Egypt

3-4 p.m., Room A243

During this session we will explore how the Ancient Egyptians wrote and multiplied numbers, as well as see their unique way of dealing with fractions.

Friday, November 1

Patricia Hamlen (Anthropology)

Indigenous Peoples and the Global System:  Where do they fit in?  Perceptions, Perspectives and Policies

9:30-10:30 a.m., Room A243

This presentation discusses the fundamental differences that exist between those populations engaging in tribalism and the encroaching Western world.  Often Western perceptions of these groups are based on myth and ethnocentric forms of stewardship that affect or undermine their cultural autonomy.  Join us as we explore Western attitudes, approaches and policies that directly impact the indigenous world within the global system.

Christine “Coco” Roschaert

Travelling and Working Globally among the Deaf-blind Communities

7-10 p.m., J-Theater (143)

An international advocate for Deafblind rights, Coco is also a motivational speaker about Deafblind issues and her personal life stories and has done over 200 presentations around the world.

 

November:

Faculty Study Abroad Workshop

Friday, November 8, 2013

11 a.m. – 12 p.m., Academy for Teaching Excellence

Come and learn about what you need to do to take a class overseas!

Global Gurus Hangout: Home, Travel, and Identity

Wednesday, November 13

3.15-4:45 p.m., Academy for Teaching Excellence, Building F

Our first topic was Cultural Stereotypes. For this second “hangout” we will discuss the concepts of Home, Travel, and Identity.

Global Gurus Hangout is International Studies and Programs' new forum to discuss your thoughts on international education and global issues. You can bring topics to debate with your colleagues, share your ideas and plans for internationalizing your curriculum, or just learn more about our internationally-minded colleagues at Harper.

The Global Gurus meetings have a semi-structured format: the ISP team will prepare videos, photos, and short presentations which will be shown at the start of the meeting and are intended as global updates, ice breakers or simply food-for-thought nuggets. Participants are encouraged to engage in the discussion and use the mingle session to get to know their colleagues, share their international education background, and explore possible collaborations in future teaching or research projects.

As this activity becomes known and interest arises, ISP encourages faculty to take the lead and propose their own topics, videos and presentations for the upcoming hangouts.

The event will be accompanied by a playlist of songs from around the world in the background to get your global groove on.

RSVP & questions: Richard Johnson, rjohnson@harpercollege.edu

October:

Fall Study Abroad Open House

Monday, October 7

5 - 7 p.m., A242ab

Students and parents are welcome to join us to hear about the exciting programs we are offering this year.

Germanfest

Wednesday, October 30

12-1 pm, A Building Atrium

Join us for free German food samples and lots of fun!

September:

International Students Reception

Thursday, September 12

3-5 p.m., PAC lobby

The International Student Office and International Studies and Programs is pleased to invite you to join us for a reception to welcome our International Students to campus.  International students are a vital and under-appreciated element of our internationalization efforts, and we would like to honor their present and future contributions to our students, curricula, faculty, staff, and community. This year alone we have 93 students from 30 different countries!

Join us in the PAC lobby anytime from 3 to 5 pm on Thursday, September 12th to welcome this dynamic groups of students.  Beverages and light hors d’oeuvres will be served.  We would appreciate an RSVP as a courtesy to help us in calculating enough food and drink for everyone, but we would welcome anyone to join us regardless.

You may RSVP to Sveta Mardar: smardar@harpercollege.edu

Global Gurus Hangout: Cultural Stereotypes

Tuesday, September 17

3 - 4:30 p.m., Academy for Teaching Excellence

Global Gurus Hangout is International Studies and Program’s new forum to discuss your thoughts on international education and global issues, bring topics to debate with your colleagues, share your ideas and plans for internationalizing your curriculum, and learn more about your internationally-minded colleagues at Harper.

The Global Gurus meetings will have a semi-structured format: the ISP team will prepare videos, photos, and short presentations which will be shown at the start of the meeting and are intended as global updates, ice breakers or simply food-for-thought nuggets. Participants are encouraged to engage in the discussion and use the mingle session to get to know their colleagues, share their international education background, and explore possible collaborations in future teaching or research projects.

The event will be accompanied by refreshments and a playlist of songs from around the world in the background to get your global groove on.

Panel on Immigration

Wednesday, September 18

1:30 - 3 p.m., Wojcik Conference Center, W218

Cindy Agustin from Illinois Coalition of Immigrant and Refugee Rights(ICIRR) will be speaking about Deferred Action, the Dream Act and sharing immigrant expeirences.

Read Around the World

Friday, September 27

12 - 2 p.m., Academy for Teaching Excellence

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel by Deborah Maggoch

Spring 2013 Events

Mulberry Child Screening followed by Q&A Session

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Harper College, Building E, Room 106 from 6-9 p.m.

Mulberry Child teaches us the human capacity for courage and endurance, and shows how the events of the past can affect our future.

Check out the trailer!

Jian Ping was born in China in 1960 during widespread famine caused by the economic disaster of Mao Zedong’s Great Leap Forward. Tens of millions starved to death in the years preceding the charismatic leader’s brutal and repressive Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) and his call to crush the “Four Olds.” Chaos became rampant as Mao empowered youth to revolution, threatening, humiliating, beating and killing anyone they chose to persecute.

Jian was tiny, premature, often sick and unwanted by an already overburdened mother of four. She was left in the care of her grandmother, Nainai, without whom she might surely have died. It wasn’t that love was lacking. It was simply unstated, expressions of emotion considered bourgeois, essentially forbidden under Communist rule.

Her parents were devoted to the Party, her mother placing duty to Mao above her own children. Her father, equally staunch in his belief, survived torture at the hands of Japanese invaders when he was young. Suspected of giving secrets to the enemy in exchange for his life while in captivity, he was later exonerated. He gradually distinguished himself, eventually becoming Deputy Governor of the city province of Baicheng.

As danger escalated under Mao, neighbors indicted neighbors. Family members informed on one another. No one was safe. Without warning, Jian’s father was arrested and imprisoned, old suspicions causing him to be publicly humiliated and labeled “Big Traitor.” Jian’s mother, a school administrator, was detained and forced to write daily self-recrimination. Strong-willed, she refused to submit to harassment by the Red Guards insisting she denounce and divorce her husband. She would not allow her children to be fatherless.

Forced to leave the Government compound, Jian’s older siblings were sent to the countryside for re-education by peasants. Jian and Nainai were banished to a remote and primitive mud hut to endure harsh conditions and sub-zero temperatures. It was years before the Cultural Revolution came to an end and Mao Zedong died in 1976. For Jian, vivid memories remain of a little girl of eight dodging a barrage of epithets and rocks as she made her way to see her father in prison. She has long held the belief that she must always remain composed, neither showing vulnerability to those who might seek to harm her nor pain to those she loves.

As China moved forward, Jian resumed her education. earning an undergraduate degree in English, then immigrating to the United States to attain two masters degrees. She married and bore a baby girl who joined her mother in the States when she was five. As Jian worked hard to provide the trappings of a middle class American life for her daughter Lisa, ironically, a sense of disconnection seeming to build between them. Her eight-year odyssey to write her memoir, Mulberry Child, was born of a need to reveal her past under Mao and share Chinese family roots with Lisa. She was saddened when Lisa showed no interest in the book.

When Jian Ping and Lisa returned to China for a bittersweet family visit and the triumphant 2008 Beijing Olympics, Lisa agreed to read the manuscript. Tracing her family’s history, she began to see her mother in a different light and accept her own heritage.

 

Read Around the World:

Friday, April 19, 2013

Harper College, Building X, Room 250 from 12-2 p.m.

We will be discussing Ha Jin novel, Nanjing Requiem

This historical novel chronicles the life of Minnie Vautrin, an American missionary and Dean of Jingling Women's College, in Nanjing (Nanking) who decided to remain at the college in hopes of being able to help during the Japanese invasion of the city. This is the story of civilians, students and staff coming together at the school as it is turned into a refurge camp and safe haven for more than 10 thousand homeless Chinese woman and children.

Discussion facilitated by Professor Tom DePalma, Department of History.

The novel is available for purchase in the Harper College Bookstore.

Other information

CRN:50928

Course Number: LFD0551-001

Credit: .2 CEUs

Adjuncts may receive a $25 stipend

Third Annual "Develop Your World: International Education Summit 2013

Friday, March 8, Wojcik Conference Center

The International Student Office and International Studies and Programs at Harper College are pleased to announce our Third Annual "Develop Your World: International Education Summit 2013 on Friday, March 8, 2013 in the Wojcik Conference Center! This Summit aims to bring together scholars, faculty, and administrators from Harper College and a variety of Illinois and Wisconsin colleges to highlight and focus on the issues of global education and comprehensive internationalization. Our theme this year is Language Study and Internationalization. Our keynote and breakout sessions will focus on aspects of language immersion through study abroad and how those experiences can enhance not only a student's language skills but also a study abroad program and larger efforts at campus internationalization.

Program of Events:

8:30 a.m.: Registration and coffee in lobby of Wojcik Conference Center, Harper College

9:00 a.m.: Keynote address (Wojcik Center Amphitheater):Dr. Lance Askildson, University of Notre Dame "The Role of Foreign Language Study in Internationalization: A Paradigm Shift for the New Century"

10:30 a.m.: 2 concurrent sessions

a) Study Abroad and Language Immersion: Dr. Li-Hua Yu, Professor of Sociology and Director of East Asian Studies Program, College of Lake County (Room W-216)

b) Developing Intercultural Competence as Educators in an Interconnected and Diverse World” Dr. Chris Cartwright, Director of Intercultural Assessment, Intercultural Communication Institute (Room W-217)

12:00 p.m.: International Buffet Lunch

1:00-2:30 p.m.: "Developing Students' Intercultural Competence in the Language Class with Online Intercultural Exchanges"

Professor Sabine Levet, Senior Lecturer in French, Foreign Languages, and Literature, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Room W-216)

For directions to and maps of the College, please visit http://goforward.harpercollege.edu/about/visit/index.php

If you are interested in registering for the Summit, please contact Jill Izumikawa on 847-925-6756 or jizumika@harpercollege.edu.

 

Carl Wilkens, the former head of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International in Rwanda

January 30, Room A243

Carl Wilkens is the former head of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency International in Rwanda. In 1994, he was the only American who chose to remain in the country after the genocide began. His choice to stay and try to help resulted in preventing the massacre of hundreds of children over the course of the genocide. Wilkens was featured in Frontline’s "Ghosts of Rwanda" and "The Few Who Stayed: Defying Genocide," an American Radio Works documentary which aired on National Public Radio. His story reminds us of the profound connection between history and the moral choices we face each day. It also arms us with new insights in the fight against genocide along with tools and inspiration for re-evaluating the relationships we are part of every day. Wilkens’ humanitarian work has been recognized with several awards including the Dignitas Humana Award from Saint John’s School of Theology Seminary and a 2005 Medal of Valor from the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

Wilkens will speak at Harper College on Wednesday, January 30th from 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. in room A243. While sharing experiences of what day to day life in Rwanda was like during the genocide, Wilkens will focus on the courage and resilience he witnessed with people facing horrendous choices in the middle of unimaginable slaughter.

Wilkens’ compelling presentation asks if we really do believe what we see, or is it more often that we see what we believe, which makes exploring what we believe about ourselves and others so important in shaping the world we are a part of. Wilkens’ telling of his own experiences puts a human “face” on genocide, showing us that the perpetrators, victims, and resistors will not soon be forgotten, and teaching participants how one person really can make a difference.

Fall 2012 Events

International Education Week:

Monday, October 29-Friday, November 2

Human Rights Art Competition

Winners' art work will be on display all week: Monday, Oct. 29-Friday, Nov. 2

Submission Deadline: Friday, October 12 (has been exteneded to October 22)

The International Studies and Programming Committee is pleased to announce it is hosting a college-wide art competition based on the theme of human rights, with the winning pieces displayed on campus during International Education Week;

The contest is open to all students, faculty, and staff of Harper College.  You do not need to be an art student or artist to apply.

Original artworks can be in any two-dimensional medium (drawing, painting, photography, collage, etc., but no sculpture, please) and must be 16” x 20” or smaller.  Artists submitting work should include a short paragraph explaining how their piece addresses the theme of human rights or a human-rights issue.  These statements will accompany the winning displays.

Submissions are due Monday, October 22, 2012, and can be dropped off in room C217.  For more information, please contact Karen Patterson at kpatters@harpercollege.edu.

Around the World in 85 Days: Opportunities for Global Intetrnships

Presented by Katerine "J.J." Pionke, University of Michigan

Monday, October 29 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Buliding A, Room A243

What does a global internship look like? How do you get one? Where could you go? Why would you do one? Come hear JJ Pionke, Adjunct Professor at Harper and University of Michigan graduate student, talk about the process of getting a series of internships that took her literally around the world this past Summer. Learn strategies that could land you that dream internship.

Education Under Fire, a documentary film

Followed by a Question and Answer session

Tuesday, October 30 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Building A, Room A243

Education Under Fire is produced by Single Arrow Productions and co-sponsored by Amnesty International. The 30-minute documentary profiles the growth, struggle, and inspiring spirit of the Baha´i Institute for Higher Education. Baha´is (BIHE) in Iran have been subjected to systematic persecution, including arrests, torture, and execution simply for refusing to recant their beliefs. They are also prohibited from going to college and blocked from many professions.

Filmed in nine cities with dozens of a dozen BIHE students or teachers, the film features footage and photos spanning two decades of BIHE classes, rare video from inside Tehran's notorious Evin Prison, and photos and a film that bring alive a series of personal stories.

Greece and Turkey Study Abroad Information Session

Tuesday, October 30 6 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Buliding A, Room A243

For more information, print our flyer Soc205Summer2013.

Film Screening: Robert Adanto's Pearls on the Ocean Floor

Followed by a brief Q&A with filmmaker

Wednesday, October 31 12:30 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

Building E, Room E108

Pearls on the Ocean Floor, a feature-length documentary, examines the lives and works of Iranian female artists living and working in and outside the Islamic Republic. This unflinching and incisive study, featuring interviews with art luminaries Shirin Neshat, Shadi Ghadirian, Parastou Forouhar, Sara Rahbar and mall-female cast, captures the uncertainty of this momentous time in Iran’s history. Speaking with grace and honesty, these brave women express what is seldom seen in the western media: unique individual perspectives regarding issues of identity, gender, and the role that art plays in challenging the traditional stereotypes often associated with women in Iran.

International Human Rights Expo

Wednesday, October 31 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Building A, Atrium

Join us for an exciting new programming joint venture between International Studies and Programs and the Human Services Program of Harper College.  The International Human Rights Expo will bring together in one place a variety of organizations involved in human rights issues, locally, nationally, and internationally.

Learn about the significance of human rights struggles around the world and find opportunities to get involved safeguarding these important values. The International Human Rights Expo at Harper College is also a great way to meet other people who want to learn about ways to change the world and gain the necessary tools to do so. We will be holding workshops and presentations through the morning and afternoon. 

The Fair is FREE and open to all, so bring your classes, your family and friends, your neighbors.

Learn how you can become involved and work for a more socially just and equitable world!

"Glocalization: How We Impact the World"

Tim Salmonson, Executive Director, Invision Global Network

Wednesday, October 31 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Building A, Room A243

Film Screening: Robert Adanot's The Rising Tide

Followed by a brief Q&A with filmmaker

Thursday, November 1 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Building E, Room E106

“Robert Adanto’s The Rising Tide shows the world how China’s contemporary artists are making sense of their crazy “brave new world,” the improbable mash-up of totalitarianism and capitalism gone wild. An often surprising and thought-provoking documentary, the featured artists throw down a collective glove to the rest of the world and declare their Sino-centric Renaissance. The rest of us better make an effort to grasp what their work is about, or get out of the way. An “eye-opener” in every sense of the word, if you are an artist, curator or art teacher be sure to catch this."

-Mark Lynch, Host of “Inquiry” on WICN

Come see the Harper College Honors Geography class give group presentations on family planning in developing countries

Thursday, November 1 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Location TBA

Spring 2012 Events

G8/NATO Summit Roundtable

Tuesday, April 24th 2pm-3:30pm in E107

Co-sponsored by International Studies and Phi Theta Kappa

What is the G8 and why do their summit events attract so much attention? What can we expect from the upcoming NATO summit in Chicago?

Three faculty members from different disciplines will address these questions and take questions from the audience.

Faculty Panel:

  • Sean Noonan, Sociology
  • Dave Richmond, History
  • Bobby Summers, Political Science

The Last Survivor: Four Tragedies, Four Journeys, One Purpose

Tuesday, April 10th from 5:30 to 7:30 in J-143 auditorium

Educational session on Human Rights, Film screening, and Discussion. Download a flyer for distribution.

The Last Survivor is an award-winning, documentary film that presents the stories of four Survivors and their struggle to make sense of tragedy by working to educate a new generation, inspire tolerance and spark a civic response to mass atrocity crimes. Following the loves of survivors of four different genocides and mass atrocities – The Holocaust, Rwanda, Darfur, and Congo – The Last Survivor presents a unique opportunity to learn from the lessons and mistakes of our past in order to have a lasting social impact on how we act collectively in the face of similar issues which still exist today.

This event is co-sponsored by Harper College Human Services Program and Internatoinal Studies and Programs. For more information, contact Valerie Walker or Richard Johnson.

Read Around the World:

All Read Around the World book discussion groups are held from 12 to 2 pm. Faculty can earn 0.2 CEUs, and Adjunct Faculty can earn a $50 stipend.

Friday, April 20: Aravind Adiga, Last Man in Tower to be moderated by Professor Kris Piepenberg, Department of English.

This compelling novel is set in bustling Mumbai, India where  self-made real estate developer and empire builder Dharmen Shah is pitted against widowed school teacher, Masterji,  a tenent who is about to be displaced.  He is: "Last Man in Tower."   A story of money, power, wealth and destitution. The characters are richly portrayed in all their human failings and where one individual stands a part as a "symbol of intergrity and quiet perserverence."

"The Iron Ladies of Liberia"

Thursday, March 8th
6:30-8:30 pm in E-106

Join us on International Women’s Day to watch and discuss the documentary, The Iron Ladies of Liberia, a film about Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf:
President Johnson-Sirlear is the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize winner, and the first democratically elected female President in Africa. We will also discuss issues pertinent in the film such as women’s rights, human rights, war, global politics, labor, and consumption.

This event is co-sponsored by International Studies and Programs and the Sociology Department.

2nd Annual International Education Summit

SAVE THE DATE: Friday, March 2, 2012

International Studies and Programs and the International Student Office of Harper College are pleased to announce our second annual Develop Your World: International Education Summit on Friday, March 2, 2012. We hope to build on the excellent attendance and participation of last year's summit to bring together scholars, faculty, and administrators from Harper College and a variety of Illinois and Wisconsin colleges to discuss directions for best practices in and the future of international education on our campuses. The focus of this year's summit will be the issues of internationalizing a college campus with particular attention to curriculum infusion. The format for this year's summit will be full-day, including both morning and afternoon sessions with a sumptuous international buffet for participants.

Schedule of Events:

  • 8:30 am: Registration and coffee in lobby of Wojcik Conference Center
  • 9 am: Keynote address (Wojcik Center Amphitheater): Dr. John Hudzik, Michigan State University and NAFSA Senior Scholar for Internationalization. "The Imperative to Internationalize U.S. Higher Education: Roles for All Institutions"
  • 10:30 am - 2 concurrent sessions:
    • a) Approaches to Curriculum Infusion (W-216) : Dr. Hilary Kahn, Director of the Center for the Study of Global Change at Indiana University. "Internationalizing Teaching and Learning: Educating toward Global Engagement and Commitment"
    • b) Study Abroad and Curriculum (W-217): Professor Christopher Deegan, Director of Study Abroad at the University of Illinois-Chicago. "Context, Process, and Results of Curriculum Development and Delivery"
  • 12 pm: International Buffet Lunch
  • 1 – 2:30 pm - 2 concurrent sessions on curriculum infusion with content from specific geographic regions:
    • a) Africa (W-216): Professor Jeffrey Rice, Department of History and Program of African Studies, Northwestern University
    • b) Southeast Asia (W-217): Professor Trude Jacobsen, Assistant Director, Center for Southeast Asian Studies and Department of History, Northern Illinois University

For more specific information on the individual sessions, please visit http://dept.harpercollege.edu/facdev/devopsn.html.

Faculty may receive 0.2 CEUs for attending the morning session (9 am to 12 pm). Adjunct faculty may receive a $50 stipend. Registration is required: register for CRN 50998 (LFD0487-001) for the morning session.

Faculty may receive 0.1 CEUs for attending either afternoon session (1 to 2:30 pm). Adjunct faculty may receive a $25 stipend. Registration is required: CRN 50999 (LFD0488-001) for the Africa session and CRN 51000 (LFD0489-001) for the Southeast Asia session.

To register for CEUs, please visit the following URL and follow the instructions there:

http://dept.harpercollege.edu/facdev/register.html

If you are interested in registering for the Summit but do not wish to receive CEUS, please contact me on 847-925-6429 or rjohnson@harpercollege.edu or Jill Izumikawa on 847-925-6756 or jizumika@harpercollege.edu.

Read Around the World:

All Read Around the World book discussion groups are held in Y-106 from 12 to 2 pm. Faculty can earn 0.2 CEUs, and Adjunct Faculty can earn a $50 stipend.

Friday, March 9: Scott Wallace, The Unconquered (Crown Publishing Group, 2011) to be moderated by Pat Hamlen, Department of Anthropology.

This account details an expedition through the tropical rain forests of Brazil in search of the Amazon's last uncontacted tribes. This trek is undertaken in the hopes of documenting an indigenous population's voluntary isolation and autonomous lifestyle. Known as the “flecheiros” or "people of the arrow" this book takes us on a hair-raising adventure into some of the most remote regions left on the planet. Click here to download a flyer with more information.

Friday, April 20: book TBD

Infuse This!: Curriculum Development Workshops for International Research and Study Overseas

  • Professor Richard Middleton-Kaplan
  • "Teaching Human Rights: Engaging Students at Home and Abroad"
  • When: Friday, February 17th from 12 to 2 pm
  • Where: X-250ab

CRN 51001 [Faculty may earn up to 0.2 CEU for attendance; Adjunct faculty receive a $50 stipend]

Outcomes:

1. To have the participant knowledgeable of the opportunities available for sabbatical opportunities in the field of human rights. 

2.  To hear first hand the unique challenges faced by human rights centers abroad in terms of funding, autonomy, and control over curriculum, and how this compares to the institutional challenges that we face here in terms of funding, curriculum, and autonomy.

3. To see how this type of opportunity is beneficial to both faculty and student understanding of human rights on the international scene.

3.  To come to understand how to adapt the experiences and interests of foreign students to Harper's student population.

Fall 2011 Events

Infuse This!: Curriculum Development Workshops for International Research and Study Overseas

Patricia Hamlen (Anthropology)

“Land of the future or of the Present? Integrating a Historical Perspective on Brazil in the Classroom”

CRN 20986 [Faculty may earn up to 0.2 CEU for attendance; Adjunct faculty receive a $50 stipend]

Room: Y—106

When:: 10 am to 12 pm on Friday, October 21

Outcomes:

Specifically, this workshop will introduce participants to

--What the grant travel experience is like and what to expect;

--What topical and curricular issues may be better understood and addressed by participating;

--How your deeper understanding of cultural issues can be incorporated to enhance your curriculum;

--How to apply for a similar opportunity yourself.

Read Around the World:

All Read Around the World book discussion groups are held in Y-106 from 12 to 2 pm. Faculty can earn 0.2 CEUs, and Adjunct Faculty can earn a $50 stipend.

Friday. September 23: Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country (Penguin Modern Classics, 2011) to be moderated by Professor Andrew Wilson, Department of English.

Friday, November 4: John Perkins, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man (Berret-Kowhler Publishers, 2004) to be moderated by Professor David Richmond, Department of History.

International Education Week: October 31 - November 4, 2011

“Connecting Globally: Community, Creativity, and Collaboration”

Schedule to be announced shortly.

Lt. Governor Sheila Simon to talk on Water Pollution

Wednesday, September 28th from 12:30 to 1 pm in D-237

Carl Wilkens, the only American to live through the Rwanda genocide in 1994, will make a multimedia presentation on his experiences.

Thursday, September 29th from 1 pm in A-243

 

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